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CONTENTS Preface 7 1QUEEN VICTORIA: A LIFE IN JEWELLERY12 2THE ROLE OF JEWELLERY, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE 80 3JEWELLERY AND DRESS 110 4THE LANGUAGE OF JEWELLERY150 5THE CULT OF NOVELTY 188 What the papers say: jewellery and topical events197 Jewellery and scientific or technical inventions200 The impact of the stage214 Surprise, deception and not so hidden messages218 Nature imitating nature: jewellery and animal products225 6BRITAIN AND THE WORLD248 The International Exhibitions 250 Links with the East: India, the Islamic world, China and Japan 294 The role of ' peasant' and regional jewellery from Continental Europe 316 7NATIONALISM AND HISTORICAL STYLES IN JEWELLERY330 Historical revival jewellery in England 337 Historicism in France: style romantiqueand Renaissance revival 354 Germany and the passion for ' Alt- Deutsch' 367 8ARCHAEOLOGICAL DISCOVERIES AND NATIONAL IDENTITY374 The Egyptian revival 379 The Assyrian revival 387 The Castellani and the Italian Risorgimento 398 The influence of Castellani outside Italy 426 The Scandinavian revival 437 The Celtic revival and Irish national identity 444 The recreation of tradition in Scotland 454 9VICTORIAN CAMEOS462 10SOUVENIRS OF TRAVEL AT HOME AND ABROAD482 Notes 506 Bibliography 539 Illustration acknowledgements 545 Index 547

Diamond lace bertha or garniture de corsageby Tiffany & Co., as displayed at the 1889 Paris Exhibition ( see Fig. 240)